Category Archives: IEEE

IEEE PC37.20.7

IEEE Draft Guide for Testing Switchgear Rated Up to 52 kV for Internal Arcing Faults

Published by: / 92 pages

Scope

This guide establishes methods by which equipment may be tested for resistance to the effects of arcing due to an internal fault. Equipment types covered in this guide include metal-enclosed switchgear as defined by IEEE Std C37.20.1TM, C37.20.2TM, C37.20.3TM and C37.20.9TM; metal-enclosed bus as defined by IEEE Std C37.23; medium-voltage ac controllers as defined by UL 347; motor control centers as defined by UL 845; switchboards as defined by UL 891; and outdoor high-voltage circuit breakers rated 38 kV and below used in an enclosure in accordance with IEEE Std C37.04TM. This guide applies only to equipment utilizing air or other insulating gas as the primary insulation medium and rated 52 kV ac or below. It applies to both indoor and outdoor equipment; however, special consideration should be given to the building size and construction for indoor applications (not fully addressed by this document).The tests and assessments described in this guide are only applicable to arcing faults occurring entirely in air or other insulating gas within the enclosure when doors and covers are properly secured in accordance with the rated Accessibility Type. This guide does not apply to arcing faults that occur within components of the equipment, such as instrument transformers, sealed interrupting devices, fuses, and so on.Designs that meet the requirements of this guide will be referred to as arc-resistant.

Abstract

Revision Standard – Unapproved Draft.

A procedure for testing and evaluating the performance of switchgear for internal arcing faults is covered. A method of identifying the capabilities of this equipment is given. Service conditions, installation, and application of equipment are also discussed. As used in this document, the term “switchgear” is used as a general term covering switching and interrupting devices and their combination with associated control, instrumentation, metering, protective and regulating devices, assemblies of those devices with associated interconnections, accessories, and supporting structures used primarily in conjunction with the generation, transmission, distribution, and conversion of electrical power.

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IEEE P3006.3

IEEE Draft Recommended Practice for Determining the Impact of Preventative Maintenance on the Reliability of Industrial and Commercial Power Systems

Published by: / 35 pages

Scope

This recommended practice describes how to determine the impact of preventive maintenance on the reliability of industrial and commercial power systems. It is likely to be of greatest value to the power-oriented engineer with limited experience in the area of reliability. It can also be an aid to all engineers responsible for the electrical design of industrial and commercial power systems.

Abstract

New IEEE Standard – Unapproved Draft.

This recommended practice describes how to determine the impact of preventive maintenance on the reliability of industrial and commercial power systems. It is likely to be of greatest value to the power oriented engineer with limited experience in the area of reliability. It can also be an aid to all engineers responsible for the electrical design of industrial and commercial power systems.

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IEEE P1679.2

IEEE Draft Guide for the Characterization and Evaluation of Sodium-Based Batteries in Stationary Applications

Published by: / 29 pages

Scope

This document provides guidance for an objective evaluation of sodium-based energy storage technologies by a potential user for any stationary application. This document is to be used in conjunction with IEEE Std 1679-2010, IEEE Recommended Practice for the Characterization and Evaluation of Emerging Energy Storage Technologies in Stationary Applications.For the purposes of this document, sodium-based batteries include those secondary (rechargeable) electrochemistries with sodium as the active species exchanged between the electrodes during charging and discharging, and operating at or above the melting point of sodium. Examples of secondary sodium-based batteries are sodium-nickel chloride and sodium-sulfur batteries. This document does not apply to aqueous sodium-based battery technologies.The outline of IEEE Std 1679-2010 is followed in this document, with tutorial information specific to sodium-based batteries provided as appropriate. Examples of tutorial information include technology descriptions, operating parameters, failure modes, safety information, battery architecture, qualification and application considerations.This document does not cover sizing, installation, maintenance and testing techniques, except insofar as they may influence the evaluation of a sodium-based battery for its intended application.

Purpose

Sodium-based batteries have been used in various, non-stationary applications for many years. They are now beginning to be used in stationary applications, and as such there is a need to provide appropriate information on safety and operating conditions related to these applications. Used with IEEE Std 1679-2010, this guide describes a format for the characterization of sodium-based battery technologies in terms of performance, service life and safety attributes. This format provides a framework for developers and manufacturers to describe their products. The resulting information assists users, integrators and servicing organizations in evaluating the possible use of these batteries in stationary applications and provides objective criteria for comparative evaluation.

Abstract

New IEEE Standard – Unapproved Draft.

This document provides guidance for evaluation of the characteristics and performance of sodium-beta 2 batteries by a potential user for stationary applications. Information regarding technology description, 3 safety, aging and failure modes, evaluation techniques, and regulatory issues is included in this guide. This 4 document is to be used in conjunction with IEEE Std 1679, IEEE Recommended Practice for the 5 Characterization and Evaluation of Emerging Energy Storage Technologies in Stationary Applications. 67Sodium-beta batteries include those secondary (rechargeable) electro-chemistries with sodium as the active 8 species exchanged between the electrodes during charging and discharging, and operating above the 9 melting point of sodium. These batteries use a solid beta-alumina electrolyte, typically written as β ‘-10 alumina. Examples of secondary sodium-beta batteries are sodium-metal chloride and sodium-sulfur 11 batteries.

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IEEE P1609.2a

IEEE Draft Standard for Wireless Access in Vehicular Environments–Security Services for Applications and Management Messages Amendment

Published by: / 112 pages

Scope

This standard defines secure message formats and processing for use by Wireless Access in Vehicular Environments (WAVE) devices, including methods to secure WAVE management messages and methods to secure application messages. It also describes administrative functions necessary to support the core security functions.

Purpose

The safety-critical nature of many Wireless Access in Vehicular Environments (WAVE) applications makes it vital that services be specified that can be used to protect messages from attacks such as eavesdropping, spoofing, alteration, and replay. Additionally, the fact that the wireless technology will be deployed in communication devices in personal vehicles as well as other portable devices, whose owners have an expectation of privacy, means that in as much as possible the security services must be designed to respect privacy and not leak personal, identifying, or linkable information to unauthorized parties. This standard describes security services for WAVE management messages and application messages designed to meet these goals, as well as providing informative material to aid interpretation.

Abstract

Amendment Standard – Unapproved Draft.

This standard defines secure message formats and processing for use by Wireless Access in Vehicular Environments (WAVE) devices, including methods to secure WAVE management messages and methods to secure application messages. It also describes administrative functions necessary to support the core security functions.

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IEEE 802.1u-2001

IEEE Standard for Virtual Bridged Local Area Networks – Corrigendum 1: Technical and Editorial Corrections

Published by: 2001-05-04 / 2001-05-04 / 20 pages

Scope

Manintenance – anticipated technical and editorial corrections to the 802.1Q-1998 standard.

Purpose

Anticipated technical and editorial corrections to the 802.1Q standard.

Abstract

Corrigendum Standard – Inactive – Superseded.

This amendment to IEEE 802.1Q,1998 Edition is intended to document maintenance items identified in the text of IEEE Std 802.1Q,1998 Edition.IEEE Std 802.1u-2001 identifies any proposed changes to IEEE Std 802.1Q,1998 Edition that have arisen as a consequence of maintenance activity.The changes are documented in the usual form for an amendment to IEEE 802 standards;i.e.,as an explicit set of editing instructions that,if correctly applied to the text of IEEE Std 802.1Q,1998 Edition,will create a corrected document.

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IEEE P802.15.8

IEEE Draft Wireless Medium Access Control (MAC) and Physical Layer (PHY) Specifications for Peer Aware Communications (PAC)

Published by: / 333 pages

Scope

This standard defines PHY and MAC mechanism for Wireless Personal Area Networks (WPAN) Peer Aware Communications (PAC) optimized for peer to peer and infrastructureless communications with fully distributed coordination. PAC features include: discovery for peer information without association, discovery signaling rate typically greater than 100 kbps, discovery of the number of devices in the network, scalable data transmission rates, typically up to 10 Mbps, group communications with simultaneous membership in multiple groups, typically up to 10, relative positioning, multihop relay, security, and operational in selected globally available unlicensed/licensed bands below 11 GHz capable of supporting these requirements.

Purpose

The purpose is to provide a global standard for scalable, low power, and highly reliable wireless communications for emerging services such as social networking, advertising, gaming, streaming, and emergency services. Existing standards may be able to provide parts of the envisioned PAC services, but no single standard provides infrastructureless peer-aware communications with fully distributed coordination.

Abstract

New IEEE Standard – Unapproved Draft.

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IEEE P802.3cc

IEEE Draft Standard for Ethernet Amendment: Physical Layer and Management Parameters for Serial 25 Gb/s Ethernet Operation Over Single-Mode Fiber

Published by: / 45 pages

Scope

This standard defines Ethernet local area, access and metropolitan area networks. Ethernet is specified at selected speeds of operation; and uses a common media access control (MAC) specification and management information base (MIB). The Carrier Sense Multiple Access with Collision Detection (CSMA/CD) MAC protocol specifies shared medium (half duplex) operation, as well as full duplex operation. Speed specific Media Independent Interfaces (MIIs) provide an architectural and optional implementation interface to selected Physical Layer entities (PHY). The Physical Layer encodes frames for transmission and decodes received frames with the modulation specified for the speed of operation, transmission medium and supported link length. Other specified capabilities include: control and management protocols, and the provision of power over selected twisted pair PHY types.

Abstract

Amendment Standard – Unapproved Draft.

This amendment to IEEE Std 802.3-2015 adds Physical Layer (PHY) specifications and management parameters for 25 Gb/s operation over single-mode fiber at reaches of at least 10 km (25GBASE-LR) and 40 km (25GBASE-ER).

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IEEE C57.12.00-1968

USA Standard General Requirements for Distribution, Power and Regulating Transformers, and Shunt Reactors

Published by: 1968-03-22 / 1968-03-22 / 33 pages

Scope

This standard applies to all distribution and power transformers and to shunt reactors ex cept as indicated below:Instrument Transformers (see USA Standard Requirements, Terminology, and Test Code for Instrument Transformers, C57.13-1968)Constant-Current Transformers of the Moving Coil Type (see USA Standard Requirements, Terminology, and Test Code for Constant Current Transformers of the Moving-Coil Type, C57.14-1964)Step- Voltage and Induction-Voltage Regulators (see USA Standard Requirements, Terminol ogy, and Test Code for Step-Voltage and Induc tion-Voltage Regulators, C57.15-1965)Current-Limiting Reactors (see USA Standard Requirements, Terminology, and Test Code for Current-Limiting Reactors, C57.16-1958)Specialty Transformers (see USA Standard Requirements and Terminology for Specialty Transformers, C89.1-1961)Rectifier Transformer Equipment (see USA Standard Requirements, Terminology, and Test Code for Pool-Cathode Mercury-Arc Rec tifier Transformers, C57.18-1964)Arc Furnace Transformers (see USA Standard Requirements for Arc Furnace Transformers, C57.17-1965)

Abstract

Revision Standard – Inactive – Superseded.

This standard was revised and greatly expanded in 1948, 1949, and 1956. The 1956 edition was comprised of a revision and editorial consolidation of the preceding standards on distribution, power , and regulating transformers, namely American Standard Requirements for Distribution, Power , and Regulating Transformers, and Reactors Other Than Current-Limiting Reactors, C57.12-1949, American Standard Test Code for Distribution , Power, and Regulating Transformers , C57.22-1948, and American Standard Requirements for Transformers-67,000 Volts and Below; 501 Through 10,000 kva, 3 Phase ; 501 Through 5,000 kva, 1 Phase, C57.12a-1954. In addition, in order to eliminate cross-references wherever possible, the consolidation contained excerpts from other standards of the C57 family

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IEEE PC62.92.6

IEEE Draft Guide for the Application of Neutral Grounding in Electrical Utility Systems, Part VI – Systems Supplied by Current-Regulated Sources

Published by: / 32 pages

Scope

This guide is intended for application to three-phase electrical utility systems and is Part 6 of an IEEE C62.92 series. This part provides definitions and considerations related to system grounding where the dominant sources of system energization are current-regulated or power-regulated power conversion devices.

Purpose

This guide defines neutral grounding in the context of current-regulated and power-regulated sources and presents basic considerations of the selection of neutral grounding parameters that will provide for the control of overvoltage on three-phase electrical utility systems in which such sources are dominant.

Abstract

New IEEE Standard – Unapproved Draft.

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IEEE P2410

IEEE Draft Standard for Biometric Open Protocol

Published by: / 125 pages

Scope

The Biometric Open Protocol Standard (BOPS) provides identity assertion, role gathering, multilevel access control, assurance, and auditing. The BOPS implementation includes software running on a client device (e.g., smartphone or mobile device), a trusted BOPS Server, and an intrusion detection system (IDS). The BOPS implementation allows pluggable components to replace existing components’ functionality, accepting integration into the current operating environments in a short period of time. The BOPS implementation adheres to the principle of continuous protection in adjudicating access to resources. Accountability is the mechanism that proves a service-level guarantee of security. The BOPS implementation allows the systems to meet security needs by using the application programming interface (API). The BOPS implementation need not know whether the underlying system is a relational database management system (RDBMS) or a search engine. The BOPS implementation functionality offers a “point-and-cut” mechanism to add the appropriate security to the production systems as well as to the systems in development.

Purpose

This standard provides a biometric-agnostic, multilevel security protocol.

Abstract

Revision Standard – Unapproved Draft.

Identity assertion, role gathering, multilevel access control, assurance, and auditing are provided by the Biometric Open Protocol Standard (BOPS). The BOPS implementation includes software running on a client device, a trusted BOPS server, and an intrusion detection system.The BOPS implementation allows pluggable components to replace existing components functionality, accepting integration into current operating environments in a short period of time.The BOPS implementation provides continuous protection to the resources and assurance of theplacement and viability of adjudication and other key features. Accountability is the mechanismthat proves a service-level guarantee of security. The BOPS implementation allows the systemsto meet security needs by using the application programming interface. The BOPS implementation need not know whether the underlying system is a relational database management system or a search engine. The BOPS implementation functionality offers a pointand-cut mechanism to add the appropriate security to the production systems as well as to the systems in development. The architecture is language neutral, allowing Representational State Transfer (REST), JavaScript Object Notation (JSON), and Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) or Transport Layer Security to provide the communication interface. The architecture is built on the servlet specification, open SSLs, Java, JSON, REST, and an open persistent store. All tools adhere to open standards, allowing maximum interoperability.There are a few use cases when biometrics matching is required on a server side. For instance, 1:M matching, which brings a challenge of a slow transaction between the client device and a server. BOPS addresses the speed of biometric authentication transaction and solves the problem of a threat on a mobile device. Such a threat assumes that an intruder decompiles the code on a copied virtual image of a mobile device, uses this source code to stop authentication calls, and attempts to get a control of a server that authenticates and grants permissions.To mitigate these risks, BOPS encrypts the initial biometric value (IBV) without the encryptionkey, then stores a half of the IBV on the client device and the other half on the server. Thebiometric matching occurs on the server.In this way, stolen device can not bypass authentication, hence compromised device or server renders no useful information to an attacker.This document describes the essential methodology to BOPS.

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