Category Archives: UOP

UOP 960-16

Trace Oxygenated Hydrocarbons in Gaseous, LPG and Liquid Hydrocarbon Streams by GC

Published by: 2016-12-31 / 2016-12-31 / 16 pages

This method is for determining trace levels of individual oxygenated hydrocarbons, with boiling points up to 138 degrees C, in refinery gas streams, C4 liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), light isomerate and naphtha. Mono-oxygenated hydrocarbons determined include C1 through C5 alcohols, and C2 through C6 carbonyls and ethers. Di-oxygenated hydrocarbons determined include C2 through C4 methyl esters and 1,4-dioxane. The range of quantitation for individual oxygenates is 0.1 to 250 mass-ppm (mg/kg). Inorganic compounds containing oxygen, such as water, carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide or other heteroatoms such as nitrogen, chlorine or sulfur are not determined. Unsaturated oxygenated hydrocarbons may be detected but are not identified. Certain oxygenated hydrocarbons are not separated and are reported as composites. Some sulfur and nitrogen compounds are known to elute in the oxygenate region of the chromatogram.

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UOP 991-17

Trace Chloride, Fluoride, and Bromide in Liquid Organics by Combustion Ion Chromatography (CIC)

Published by: 2017-02-01 / 2017-02-01 / 14 pages

This method is for determining trace concentrations of chloride, fluoride, and bromide in liquid organics by Combustion Ion Chromatography (CIC). This method has a lower limit of quantitation of 0.1 mg/kg (mass-ppm) for fluoride and chloride, and 0.2 mg/kg for bromide.

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UOP 1014-17

Determination of Trace Propadiene and Methyl Acetylene Impurities in Polymer Grade Propylene by Gas Chromatography

Published by: 2017-01-15 / 2017-01-15 / 11 pages

This method is for determining trace methyl acetylene and propadiene (MAPD) in high purity polymer grade propylene liquid or gas using a preconfigured, commercially available gas chromatograph. Other impurities of C3-C5 if present can also be determined. The range of quantitation for each component is 0.2 to 2000 mass- (or mol-) ppm. This method can be used to determine trace impurities in ethylene with appropriate gas injection valve and customized run program. For a full characterization of the C5 minus impurities to a lower limit of quantitation of 2 ppm refer to UOP 899.

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UOP 1015-17

Determination of Trace Oxygenates in Polymer Grade Ethylene & ropylene by Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry

Published by: 2017-01-15 / 2017-01-15 / 13 pages

This method is for determining trace oxygenated components in high purity polymer grade ethylene and propylene gas or liquid using a gas chromatograph equipped with a mass spectrometer run in selected ion monitoring mode. The specific instrument is preconfigured and is capable of determining typical impurities in polymer grade ethylene or propylene, however this method only outlines the procedure for determining the specific oxygenates 2-butanol, acetone, acetaldehyde, ethanol, isopropanol, methanol, methyl tert-butyl ether, n-propanol, n-butanol and tert-butanol. Some components co-elute but are readily extracted by unique ions. The lower limit of quantitation for each component is 0.05 mol-(or mass-) ppm.

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UOP 791-16

Sulfur Components In LPG Fractions by GC-SCD

Published by: 2016-12-02 / 2016-12-02 / 9 pages

This method is for determining trace amounts of sulfur species in liquefied petroleum gases (LPG) streams using a gas chromatograph equipped with a sulfur chemiluminescence detector (GC-SCD). Individual components are determined quantitatively from 0.1 to approximately 200 mass ppm sulfur. Higher concentrations of sulfur may be measured by modifying the instrument conditions to accomodate the increase in signal.

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UOP 1013-16

Total Chloride in Liquid Hydrocarbons by Wavelength Dispersive X-Ray Flourescence

Published by: 2016-11-04 / 2016-11-04 / 7 pages

This method is for determining the total chloride content of liquid hydrocarbons by wavelength dispersive X-ray Flourescence (XRF) spectroscopy. The example given here focuses specifically on gasoline matrix but other hydrocarbon matrices are applicable if calibration standards of similar matrix are used. Highly volatile hydrocarbon species (e.g. LPG) are not applicable. The calibration has been set up for quantitative determination chloride from 5 mass-ppm to 1000 mass-pmm (0.0005 mass-% to 0.1000 mass-%). Matrix effects are not significant over this range so long as routine samples and calibration standards are well matched.

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UOP 614-16

Heptane or Toluene Insoluble Matter in Petroleum Oils Using Vacuum Filtration

Published by: 2016-08-15 / 2016-08-15 / 7 pages

This method is for the determination of either heptane or toluene insoluble material in petroleum oils and is applicable to samples that are fluid at about 80 degrees C. This method covers the range of 0.01 to about 25 mass-% insolubles. Solid particulate materials interfere. More viscous or solid materials such as asphalts may be analyzed using this method but will require using a heated sonicating bath (up to 60 degrees C). The data provided by this method may be used as an index to coking tendency of petroleum oils when considering their suitability as charge stocks to cracking or other processes.

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UOP 936-16

Combined Nitrogen in LPG by Chemiluminescence

Published by: 2016-08-03 / 2016-08-03 / 14 pages

This method is for determining combined nitrogen in liquefied petroleum gas (LPG). The method determines all nitrogen compounds that are extractable by aqueous acid, including ammonia, amines, nitriles and amides. The method is particularly useful for LPG samples containing nitrogen species, such as ammonia and amines, which can readily adsorb on stainless steel surfaces in contact with the LPG. The procedure yields quantitative results in the range of approximately 0.2 mass-ppm (mg/kg) to approximately 3 mass%.

This method is also used as a preparation step for the analysis of basic nitrogen in LPG by UOP Method 939, “Basic Nitrogen in LPG by Ion Chromatography.”

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UOP 925-16

Nickel, Molybdenum, Phosphorus, Cobalt and Aluminum in Fresh Catalysts by ICP-OES

Published by: 2016-05-02 / 2016-05-02 / 7 pages

This method is for determining nickel, molybdenum, phosphorus and cobalt in fresh gamma-alumina supported catalysts; and nickel (Ni), molybdenum (Mo), phosphorus (P), cobalt (Co) and aluminum (Al) in fresh silica-alumina supported catalysts of known composition by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Optical Emission Spectrometry (ICP-OES). The method is suitable for determining nickel over a range of 1 to 10 mass-%, molybdenum over a range of 5 to 20 mass-%, phosphorus (as phosphate only) over a range of 0.5 to 25 mass-%, cobalt over a range of 1 to 5 mass-%, and aluminum over a range of 5 to 50 mass-%. Catalysts containing alpha- or theta-alumina phases cannot be analyzed by the method. Nickel bearing catalysts that also contain tungsten are analyzed by UOP Method 924.

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UOP 602-15

Soxhlet Extraction of Catalyst

Published by: UOP LLC, A Honeywell Company / 2015-05-22 / 9 pages

This method is for separating hydrocarbons from catalyst samples by extraction with a volatile solvent. This extraction is used to obtain a hydrocarbon and water free catalyst sample for carbon determination by UOP Method 703, “Carbon on Catalysts by Induction Furnace Combustion and Infrared Detection.” It can also be used to determine the non-volatile hydrocarbon content of the sample, or to provide an extract for subsequent analysis. The use of an automated system is described in the Appendix. For self-heating samples, refer to the drying procedure in the Appendix.

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