Tag Archives: CAN

CAN/CSA C22.2 NO. 60335-2-24:17

Safety Requirements for Household and Similar Electrical Appliances, Part 2: Particular Requirements for Refrigerating Appliances, Ice-Cream Appliances and Ice-Makers (Binational standard with UL 60335-2-24)

Published by: 2017-04-01 / 2017-04-01 / 119 pages

Preface

This is the harmonized CSA Group and UL standard for particular requirements for refrigerating appliances, ice-cream appliances and ice makers. It is the second edition of CAN/CSA-C22.2 No. 60335-2-24, and the second edition of UL 60335-2-24. This edition of CAN/CSA-C22.2 No. 60335-2-24 supersedes the previous edition published on August 21, 2006 and replaces CSA C22.2 No. 63-93, Household Refrigerators and Freezers. This edition of UL 60335-2-24 supersedes the previous edition published on August 21, 2006.

This harmonized standard is based on IEC Publication 60335-2-24: Edition 7.1, Household and Similar Electrical Appliances – Safety – Part 2-24: Particular Requirements for Refrigerating Appliances, Ice-Cream Appliances and Ice-Makers, issued May 2012. IEC 60335-2-24 is copyrighted by the IEC.

Scope

This clause of part 1 is replaced by the following:

This International Standard deals with the safety of the following appliances, their RATED VOLTAGE being not more than 250 V for single-phase appliances, 480 V for other appliances and 24 V d.c. for appliances when battery operated:

– REFRIGERATING APPLIANCES for household and similar use;

– ICE-MAKERS incorporating a motor-compressor and ICE-MAKERS intended to be incorporated in frozen food storage compartments;

– REFRIGERATING APPLIANCES and ICE-MAKERS for use in camping, touring caravans and boats for leisure purposes.

These appliances may be operated from the mains, from a separate battery or operated either from the mains or from a separate battery.

This standard also deals with the safety of ICE-CREAM APPLIANCES intended for household use, their RATED VOLTAGE being not more than 250 V for single-phase appliances and 480 V for other appliances.

It also deals with COMPRESSION-TYPE APPLIANCES for household and similar use, which use FLAMMABLE REFRIGERANTS.

This standard does not cover features of the construction and operation of those REFRIGERATING APPLIANCES which are dealt with in other IEC standards.

Refrigerating appliances not intended for normal household use but which nevertheless may be a source of danger to the public, such as

– REFRIGERATING APPLIANCES used in staff kitchen areas in shops, offices and other working environments,

– REFRIGERATING APPLIANCES used in farm houses and by clients in hotels, motels and other residential type environments,

– REFRIGERATING APPLIANCES used in bed and breakfast type environments, and

– REFRIGERATING APPLIANCES used in catering and similar non-retail applications

are within the scope of this standard.

As far as is practicable, this standard deals with the common hazards presented by appliances that are encountered by all persons in and around the home. However, in general, it does not take into account

– persons (including children) whose


  • physical, sensory or mental capabilities or

  • lack of experience and knowledge

prevents them from using the appliance safely without supervision or instruction;

– children playing with the appliance.

NOTE 1 Attention is drawn to the fact that

– for appliances intended to be used in vehicles or on board ships or aircraft, additional requirements may be necessary;

– in many countries, additional requirements are specified by national health authorities, the national authorities responsible for the protection of labour, the national water supply authorities and similar authorities.

NOTE 2 This standard does not apply to

– appliances intended to be used in the open air;

– appliances designed exclusively for industrial purposes;

– appliances intended to be used in locations where special conditions prevail, such as the presence of a corrosive or explosive atmosphere (dust, vapour or gas);

– appliances incorporating a battery intended as a power supply for the refrigerating function;

– appliances assembled on site by the installer;

– appliances with remote motor-compressors;

– motor-compressors (IEC 60335-2-34);

– commercial dispensing appliances and vending appliances (IEC 60335-2- 75);

– commercial refrigerators and freezers used for the display of food products, including beverages, for retail sale (IEC 60335-2-89);

– commercial ice-cream appliances.

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CAN/CSA C22.2 NO. 60950-22:17

Information Technology Equipment – Safety – Part 22: Equipment to be Installed Outdoors (Bi-National standard, with UL 60950-22)

Published by: 2017-03-01 / 2017-03-01 / 53 pages

Preface

This is the harmonized CSA and UL Standard for Information Technology Equipment – Safety – Part 22: Equipment to be Installed Outdoors. It is the second edition of CAN/CSA-C22.2 No. 60950-22 and the second edition of UL 60950-22. This edition of CAN/CSA-C22.2 No. 60950-22 supersedes the previous edition published on April 23, 2007. This edition of UL 60950-22 supersedes the previous edition published on April 23, 2007.

This harmonized standard is based on IEC Publication 60950-22: second edition, Information Technology Equipment – Safety – Part 22: Equipment to be Installed Outdoors, issued January 2016. IEC 60950-22 is copyrighted by the IEC.

Scope

1.1 Equipment covered

This part of IEC 60950 applies to information technology equipment intended to be installed in an OUTDOOR LOCATION.

The requirements for OUTDOOR EQUIPMENT also apply, where relevant, to OUTDOOR ENCLOSURES suitable for direct installation in the field and supplied for housing information technology equipment to be installed in an OUTDOOR LOCATION.

1.2 Additional requirements

Each installation may have particular requirements. Some examples are given in 4.2. In addition, requirements for protection of the OUTDOOR EQUIPMENT against the effects of direct lightning strikes are not covered by the standard. For information on this subject, see IEC 62305-1 NFPA 780 or CAN/CSA-B72.


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Préface

Ce document constitue la norme harmonisée au Groupe CSA et aux UL visant les Matériels de traitement de l’information – Sécurité – Partie 22 : Matériels destinés à être installés à l’extérieur. Il s’agit de la deuxième édition de la CAN/CSA-C22.2 nº 60950-22 et de la deuxième édition de l’UL 60950-22. Cette édition de la CAN/CSA-C22.2 nº 60950-22 remplace l’édition antérieure publiée le 23 avril 2007. Cette édition de l’UL 60950-22 remplace l’édition antérieure publiée le 23 avril 2007.

Cette norme harmonisée est basée sur la publication IEC 60950-22, deuxième édition, Matériels de traitement de l’information – Sécurité – Partie 22 : Matériels destinés à être installés à l’extérieur, publiée en janvier 2016. La publication IEC 60950-22 est protégée par droits d’auteur de l’IEC.

Domaine d’application

1.1 Matériels couverts

La présente partie de l’IEC 60950 s’applique aux matériels de traitement de l’information destinés à être installés dans un EMPLACEMENT POUR INSTALLATION EXTERIEURE.

Les exigences pour les MATERIELS POUR INSTALLATION EXTERIEURE s’appliquent également, s’il y a lieu, aux ENVELOPPES POUR INSTALLATION EXTERIEURE adaptées pour une installation directe sur le terrain et fournies pour loger les matériels de traitement de l’information destinés à être installés dans un EMPLACEMENT POUR INSTALLATION EXTERIEURE.

1.2 Exigences complémentaires

Chaque installation peut avoir des exigences particulières. Certains exemples sont donnés en 4.2. De plus, les exigences pour la protection des MATERIELS POUR INSTALLATION EXTERIEURE contre les effets des coups de foudre directs ne sont pas couvertes par la norme. Pour obtenir des informations concernant ce sujet, voir l’IEC 62305-1.

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CAN/CSA Z317.11-17

Area Measurement for Health Care Facilities

Published by: 2017-03-01 / 2017-03-01

Preface

This is the third edition of CSA Z317.11, Area measurement for health care facilities. It supersedes the previous editions published in 2002 and 1982.

This Standard defines the methods by which certain commonly used measurements of floor area should be made. These provisions are intended to simplify the task of making comparisons between similar buildings for health care facilities in different parts of Canada.

Changes to this edition include the following:

a) alignment of terms and definitions with CSA Z8000;

b) additional definitions and requirements for interstitial space, mechanical space, net area, and shelled space;

c) addition of general requirements for scoping and planning of area measurement activities;

d) provision for measurement and recording of spaces that are not necessarily part of the component gross or building gross;

e) guidance on the relationship between this Standard and the commercial measurement methodologies that are often applied in leasing situations;

f) guidance on measurement of circulation space directly associated with certain room elements, such as multiple workstations; and

g) updated diagrams illustrating gross and net areas.

Scope

1.1
This Standard establishes requirements for area measurement in health care facilities (HCFs). It is intended to provide a basic, uniform system to

a) support HCF planning and design activities that require such measurements (e.g., functional programming, building and room design, administration, cost estimating, and funding of capital programs); and

b) facilitate meaningful comparisons between HCFs throughout Canada.

1.2
The measurement techniques established by this Standard apply to both existing buildings and new construction.

Note: When applying these measurement techniques to alterations and renovations of existing buildings, the user of this Standard is advised to exercise judgement in defining the limits of the areas measured and in relating area measurements to the cost of the work because of the widely varied nature of such work.

1.3
This Standard is applicable to all floor area measurements in a health care facility. It does not address measurements directly related to compliance with jurisdictional codes and regulations.

Note: When assessing building code compliance, the appropriate building code definitions apply.

1.4
In this Standard, “shall” is used to express a requirement, i.e., a provision that the user is obliged to satisfy in order to comply with the Standard; “should” is used to express a recommendation or that which is advised but not required; and “may” is used to express an option or that which is permissible within the limits of the Standard.

Notes accompanying clauses do not include requirements or alternative requirements; the purpose of a note accompanying a clause is to separate from the text explanatory or informative material.

Notes to tables and figures are considered part of the table or figure and may be written as requirements.

Legends to equations and figures are considered requirements.

1.5
The values given in SI units are the units of record for the purposes of this Standard. The values given in parentheses are for information and comparison only.

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CAN/CSA-ISO/IEC 19785-3:16

Information technology – Common Biometric Exchange Formats Framework – Part 3: Patron format specifications (Adopted ISO/IEC 19785-3:2015, second edition, 2015-09-01)

Published by: 2016-12-01 / 2016-12-01 / 101 pages

CSA Preface

Standards development within the Information Technology sector is harmonized with international standards development. Through the CSA Technical Committee on Information Technology (TCIT), Canadians serve as the SCC Mirror Committee (SMC) on ISO/IEC Joint Technical Committee 1 on Information Technology (ISO/IEC JTC1) for the Standards Council of Canada (SCC), the ISO member body for Canada and sponsor of the Canadian National Committee of the IEC. Also, as a member of the International Telecommunication Union (ITU), Canada participates in the International Telegraph and Telephone Consultative Committee (ITU-T).

For brevity, this Standard will be referred to as “CAN/CSA-ISO/IEC 19785-3” throughout.

At the time of publication, ISO/IEC 19785-3:2015 is available from ISO and IEC in English only. CSA Group will publish the French version when it becomes available from ISO and IEC.

Scope

This part of ISO/IEC 19785 specifies and publishes registered CBEFF patron formats (see ISO/IEC 19785-1) defined by the CBEFF patron ISO/IEC JTC 1/SC 37, and specifies their registered CBEFF patron format types (see ISO/IEC 19785-2) and resulting full ASN.1 Object Identifiers.

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CAN/CSA-ISO/IEC 16350:16

Information technology – Systems and software engineering – Application management (Adopted ISO/IEC 16350:2015, first edition, 2015-08-01)

Published by: 2016-12-01 / 2016-12-01 / 103 pages

CSA Preface

Standards development within the Information Technology sector is harmonized with international standards development. Through the CSA Technical Committee on Information Technology (TCIT), Canadians serve as the SCC Mirror Committee (SMC) on ISO/IEC Joint Technical Committee 1 on Information Technology (ISO/IEC JTC1) for the Standards Council of Canada (SCC), the ISO member body for Canada and sponsor of the Canadian National Committee of the IEC. Also, as a member of the International Telecommunication Union (ITU), Canada participates in the International Telegraph and Telephone Consultative Committee (ITU-T).

For brevity, this Standard will be referred to as “CAN/CSA-ISO/IEC 16350” throughout.

At the time of publication, ISO/IEC 16350:2015 is available from ISO and IEC in English only. CSA Group will publish the French version when it becomes available from ISO and IEC.

Scope

1.1 General

This International Standard establishes a common framework for application management processes with well-defined terminology that can be referenced by the software industry. It contains processes, activities, and tasks that apply during the stage of operation and use from the point of view of the supplier organization that enhances, maintains, and renews the application software and the software-related products such as data-structures, architecture, designs, and other documentation.

This International Standard applies to the supply, maintenance, and renewal of applications, whether performed internally or externally with respect to the organization that uses the applications.

Application management comprises all of the tasks, responsibilities, and activities with the aim that the support of business processes by applications continues to meet the requirements and needs of the organizations that use these applications throughout the entire life span of their business processes.

This International Standard therefore focuses on the following:

– day-to-day management of applications (the software) and the related data structures and support of costumer organizations, including handling calls such as incidents and service requests;

– maintenance and renewal of applications and data structures in accordance with changing requirements and needs;

– opportunities, threats, and changes in the business and/or technology that influence the future of the applications and, based on that, the strategy for maintaining and renewing the applications;

– organization and strategy of application management organizations.

Before retirement, the life cycle of an application consists of two important stages: the stage of initial development of the application and the stage of operation and use (when the software is in use, in operation, supported, modified, and renewed). This stage of operation and use is the subject of this International Standard. The initial development of an application is not within the scope of this International Standard, however the project that is responsible for the initial development has to take the requirements of the application management organization that will enhance and maintain the application into consideration. This means that the application management organization will ask the project to deliver initial requirements, architecture products, design, standards, and other documentation, in order to use these products during enhancement and maintenance.

In the stage of operation and use, the following three domains play a role:

a) business information management representing the business and end users of the application (use);

b) IT infrastructure management hosting the application (operation) and maintaining the technical infrastructure;

c) application management


    1) supporting the use and the operation;

    2) maintaining and renewing the application software and data structures.

Business information management constitutes the demand side of information technology (IT) and information provisioning. Business information management is responsible for supporting users in the use of the information provisioning and represents the business organization as the client of the IT-suppliers. Business information management acts as the customer of the IT organizations (application management plus IT infrastructure management).

Specific tasks of business information management include the following:

– support of end users in how the information provisioning are to be used;

– define how information and IT are to look like (the functionality, the appearance, etc);

– advise and support business management with the prioritization of requirements and management of their budgets for IT;

– assign work to IT providers and monitor their delivered services;

– define long term policy and plans regarding the information provisioning.

IT infrastructure management is responsible for managing the operation of the information system, including maintaining the infrastructure (e.g. network, hardware), running the software, and data processing. In brief, this is the organization that runs the information systems and aims to keep the infrastructure in good order.

The activities of business information management and IT infrastructure management are closely related to application management but not within the scope of this International Standard.

Application management is responsible for the management and maintenance of the application and definition of the data structures used in databases and data files. This form of management requires knowledge of software programming, information system development, design, day-to-day management of applications, and application maintenance. Core qualities of the application management personnel are in-depth knowledge of the customer or (at least) in-depth knowledge of the customer’s business processes and in-depth knowledge of the existing applications (application objects), design, architecture, etc.

This International Standard consists of the following three levels of processes:

– operational;

– managerial;

– strategic.

These process levels and the processes are interconnected with one another.

There are no separate processes defined for security, issues, risks, and/or vulnerability. These topics form an important part of the Continuity Management Process, but they are also part of other processes. Security, for instance, is an important part of the functionality of the application, so it is addressed in the Impact Analysis process and dealt with within the specifications of the application and defined in the Software Design Process and also within the service levels and, therefore, specified in the Agreement Management and Supplier Management Processes. Other processes which deal with these topics are the management processes planning and control, quality management and financial management, and, for instance, the strategic process technology definition, where risk and vulnerability are important features.

1.2 Applicability

1.2.1 Audience

This International Standard is intended to be used by application management organizations. The application management service providers that enhance, maintain, and/or renew applications or application objects and that support infrastructure management organizations and user organization in the stage operation and use.

Other users of this International Standard can be application software developers, quality assurance managers (or consultants), and customers of application management organizations.

The purpose of this International Standard is to provide a defined set of processes to facilitate communication among all parties involved in application management.

Different parties can carry out different activities in the field of application management. For example, some parties are responsible for maintenance of the application after the development stage while others also support the user organization and the IT infrastructure management organization. Some parties just change the software items while others are responsible for the entire chain of impact analysis, design, build, test, and release of changes. These different parties can be all in one organization or in different internal and external organizations.

The following are examples of different types of application management organizations shown in Figure 4:

– organization that produces and maintains a specific component;

– organization that supplies and maintains standard products or standard components;

– organization that delivers custom services to an individual customer, either with or without integration with other systems or the infrastructure;

– organization that manages and maintains a custom application;

– organization that implements software.

The following are other examples of application management organizations:

– integrator that merges or combines services;

– producer of configurable software platforms;

– organization that configures and maintains such platforms for customers.

These types of application management organizations have a strong impact on the way in which the processes are implemented and operated. The processes shown in Figure 3 therefore vary in importance and characteristics.

1.2.2 Field of application

This International Standard is applicable to all the following organizations using the processes that play a role in application management within the scope mentioned in 1.1:

– anyone performing application management activities;

– those responsible for establishing and continuously improving application management processes;

– those responsible for executing application management processes at a project level;

– customers and suppliers involved in subcontracting application management activities;

– those responsible for assessing application management processes.

Annex C provides information regarding the use of the application management processes as a process reference model. It defines the basic activities needed to perform tailoring of this International Standard. It has to be noted that tailoring might diminish the perceived value of a claim of conformance to this International Standard. An organization asserting a single-party claim of conformance to this International Standard might find it advantageous to claim full conformance to a smaller list of processes rather than tailored conformance to a larger list of processes.

1.3 Limitations

The initial development of an application is not within the scope of this International Standard.

The activities of business information management and IT infrastructure management are not within the scope of this International Standard.

This International Standard does not detail the application management processes in terms of methods or working procedures required to meet the requirements and outcomes of a process.

This International Standard does not detail documentation to be used or produced within the activities described in the processes in Clause 5 in terms of name, format, explicit content, and recording media. The International Standard might require development of documents of similar class or type. The International Standard, however, does not imply that such documents have to be developed or packaged separately or combined in some fashion. These decisions are left to the user of this International Standard.

This International Standard does not prescribe a specific application management methodology, design methodology, development methodology, test methodology, project management method, or other methods, models, or techniques. The users of this International Standard are responsible for selecting these methods and mapping the processes, activities, and tasks in this International Standard onto those methods. The users of this International Standard are also responsible for selecting and applying the methods and for performing the activities and tasks suitable for application management.

This International Standard is not intended to be in conflict with any organization’s policies, procedures, and standards or with any national laws and regulations. Any such conflict has to be resolved before using this International Standard.

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CAN/CSA-ISO/IEC 19763-1:16

Information technology – Metamodel framework for interoperability (MFI) – Part 1: Framework (Adopted ISO/IEC 19763-1:2015, second edition, 2015-06-15)

Published by: 2016-12-01 / 2016-12-01 / 37 pages

CSA Preface

Standards development within the Information Technology sector is harmonized with international standards development. Through the CSA Technical Committee on Information Technology (TCIT), Canadians serve as the SCC Mirror Committee (SMC) on ISO/IEC Joint Technical Committee 1 on Information Technology (ISO/IEC JTC1) for the Standards Council of Canada (SCC), the ISO member body for Canada and sponsor of the Canadian National Committee of the IEC. Also, as a member of the International Telecommunication Union (ITU), Canada participates in the International Telegraph and Telephone Consultative Committee (ITU-T).

For brevity, this Standard will be referred to as “CAN/CSA-ISO/IEC 19763-1” throughout.

At the time of publication, ISO/IEC 19763-1:2015 is available from ISO and IEC in English only. CSA Group will publish the French version when it becomes available from ISO and IEC.

Scope

1.1 Inclusions

This is a part of the ISO/IEC19763 (Metamodel framework for interoperability) (MFI) family of standards. As the first part of MFI, this part provides an overview of the whole of MFI. In particular, the purpose, the underlying concepts, the overall architecture and the requirements for the development of other standards within the MFI family are described.

MFI provides a set of normative metamodels to enable the registration of many different types of model. Each of these metamodels is expressed as a UML Class Diagram.

MFI is evolving. Currently, in addition to this part, the MFI family comprises:

– A core model and facilities for the basic mapping of models (Part 10)

– A metamodel for ontology registration (Part 3)

– A metamodel for process model registration (Part 5)

– A metamodel for service model registration (Part 7)

– A metamodel for role and goal model registration (Part 8)

– A Technical Report describing on demand model selection based on RGPS (Role, Goal, Process and Service) (Part 9)

– A metamodel for information model registration (Part 12)

– A metamodel for form design registration (Part 13)

– A metamodel for a registry summary (Part 6)

These parts are described in more detail in Annex A.

1.2 Exclusions

The MFI does not specify any physical structure of the registry where model information is to be recorded. MFI metamodels define standard views as models to be used in the registering of model instances in a model registry while actual instance documents could be stored in a model repository.

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CAN/CSA-ISO/IEC 23003-4:16

Information technology – MPEG audio technologies – Part 4: Dynamic Range Control (Adopted ISO/IEC 23003-4:2015, first edition, 2015-11-15)

Published by: 2016-12-01 / 2016-12-01 / 124 pages

CSA Preface

Standards development within the Information Technology sector is harmonized with international standards development. Through the CSA Technical Committee on Information Technology (TCIT), Canadians serve as the SCC Mirror Committee (SMC) on ISO/IEC Joint Technical Committee 1 on Information Technology (ISO/IEC JTC1) for the Standards Council of Canada (SCC), the ISO member body for Canada and sponsor of the Canadian National Committee of the IEC. Also, as a member of the International Telecommunication Union (ITU), Canada participates in the International Telegraph and Telephone Consultative Committee (ITU-T).

For brevity, this Standard will be referred to as “CAN/CSA-ISO/IEC 23003-4” throughout.

At the time of publication, ISO/IEC 23003-4:2015 is available from ISO and IEC in English only. CSA Group will publish the French version when it becomes available from ISO and IEC.

Scope

This part of ISO/IEC 23003 specifies technology for loudness and dynamic range control. This International Standard is applicable to most MPEG audio technologies. It offers flexible solutions to efficiently support the widespread demand for technologies such as loudness normalization and dynamic range compression for various playback scenarios.

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CAN/CSA-ISO/IEC 11889-3:16

Information technology – Trusted Platform Module Library – Part 3: Commands (Adopted ISO/IEC 11889-3:2015, second edition, 2015-12-15)

Published by: 2016-12-01 / 2016-12-01 / 494 pages

CSA Preface

Standards development within the Information Technology sector is harmonized with international standards development. Through the CSA Technical Committee on Information Technology (TCIT), Canadians serve as the SCC Mirror Committee (SMC) on ISO/IEC Joint Technical Committee 1 on Information Technology (ISO/IEC JTC1) for the Standards Council of Canada (SCC), the ISO member body for Canada and sponsor of the Canadian National Committee of the IEC. Also, as a member of the International Telecommunication Union (ITU), Canada participates in the International Telegraph and Telephone Consultative Committee (ITU-T).

For brevity, this Standard will be referred to as “CAN/CSA-ISO/IEC 11889-3” throughout.

At the time of publication, ISO/IEC 11889-3:2015 is available from ISO and IEC in English only. CSA Group will publish the French version when it becomes available from ISO and IEC.

Scope

This part of ISO/IEC 11889 contains the definitions of the Trusted Platform Module (TPM) commands. These commands make use of the constants, flags, structures, and union definitions defined in ISO/IEC 11889-2.

The detailed description of the operation of the commands is written in the C language with extensive comments. The behavior of the C code in this part of ISO/IEC 11889 is normative but does not fully describe the behavior of a TPM. The combination of this part of ISO/IEC 11889 and ISO/IEC 11889-4 is sufficient to fully describe the required behavior of a TPM.

The code this part of ISO/IEC 11889 and ISO/IEC 11889-4 is written to define the behavior of a compliant TPM. In some cases it is not possible to provide a compliant implementation. In those cases, any implementation provided by the vendor that meets the general description of the function provided in this part of ISO/IEC 11889 would be compliant.

EXAMPLE Firmware update is a case where it is not possible to provide a compliant implementation.

The code in thie part of ISO/IEC 11889 and ISO/IEC 11889-4 is not written to meet any particular level of conformance nor does this specification require that a TPM meet any particular level of conformance.

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CAN/CSA-ISO/IEC 19785-1:16

Information technology – Common Biometric Exchange Formats Framework – Part 1: Data element specification (Adopted ISO/IEC 19785-1:2015, second edition, 2015-08-01)

Published by: 2016-12-01 / 2016-12-01 / 64 pages

CSA Preface

Standards development within the Information Technology sector is harmonized with international standards development. Through the CSA Technical Committee on Information Technology (TCIT), Canadians serve as the SCC Mirror Committee (SMC) on ISO/IEC Joint Technical Committee 1 on Information Technology (ISO/IEC JTC1) for the Standards Council of Canada (SCC), the ISO member body for Canada and sponsor of the Canadian National Committee of the IEC. Also, as a member of the International Telecommunication Union (ITU), Canada participates in the International Telegraph and Telephone Consultative Committee (ITU-T).

For brevity, this Standard will be referred to as “CAN/CSA-ISO/IEC 19785-1” throughout.

At the time of publication, ISO/IEC 19785-1:2015 is available from ISO and IEC in English only. CSA Group will publish the French version when it becomes available from ISO and IEC.

Scope

This part of ISO/IEC 19785 defines structures and data elements for biometric information records (BIRs).

This part of ISO/IEC 19785 defines the concept of a domain of use to establish the applicability of a standard or specification that complies with CBEFF requirements.

This part of ISO/IEC 19785 defines the concept of a CBEFF patron format, which is a published BIR format specification that complies with CBEFF requirements, specified by a CBEFF patron.

This part of ISO/IEC 19785 defines the abstract values (and associated semantics) of a set of CBEFF data elements to be used in the definition of CBEFF patron formats.

This part of ISO/IEC 19785 specifies the use of CBEFF data elements by a CBEFF patron to define the content and encoding of a standard biometric header (SBH) to be included in a biometric information record (i.e. the definition of a CBEFF patron format).

This part of ISO/IEC 19785 provides the means for identification of the formats of the BDBs in a BIR but the standardization and interoperability of BDB formats are not in the scope of this part of ISO/IEC 19785. It also provides a means (the security block) for BIRs to carry information about the encryption of a BDB in the BIR and about integrity mechanisms applied to the BIR as a whole; the structure and content of security blocks are not in the scope of this part of ISO/IEC 19785. Further, the specification of encryption mechanisms for BDBs and of integrity mechanisms for BIRs is not in the scope of this part of ISO/IEC 19785.

This part of ISO/IEC 19785 specifies transformations from one CBEFF patron format to a different CBEFF patron format.

The encoding of the abstract values of CBEFF data elements to be used in the specification of CBEFF patron formats is not in the scope of this part of ISO/IEC 19785.

ISO/IEC 19785-3 specifies several patron format specifications for which ISO/IEC JTC 1 SC 37 is the CBEFF patron.

ISO/IEC 19785-4 specifies several security block format specifications for which ISO/IEC JTC 1 SC 37 is the CBEFF patron.

Protection of the privacy of individuals from inappropriate dissemination and use of biometric data is not in the scope of this part of ISO/IEC 19785 but may be subject to national regulation.

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