Tag Archives: CSA

CSA 6.19-17

Residential Carbon Monoxide Alarming Devices

Published by: 2017-01-01 / 2017-01-01 / 145 pages

Preface

This is the second edition of CSA 6.19, Residential carbon monoxide alarming devices. It supersedes the previous editions published in 2001 under the title Residential Carbon Monoxide Detectors and in 1993 as a Canadian Gas Association Standard, CAN/CGA-6.19.

The following are the most significant changes to this edition:

a) The Scope has been expanded to identify more clearly the living spaces to which the Standard applies. It includes ordinary indoor residential areas including dwelling units, recreational vehicles, mobile homes, unconditioned areas (e.g., cottages, cabins, attached garages), and facilities providing detention occupancy, treatment occupancy, and care occupancy, but not spaces intended for industrial or commercial applications.

b) The Scope has been expanded to include devices that numerically display low (< 30 ppm) CO levels. This newer class of devices is not intended to provide an alarm signal during long-term, low-level CO exposures or slightly higher short-term transient CO exposure.

c) The following definitions have been modified: sensor and trouble signal.

d) The following definitions have been added: CO alarm with low-level CO indication, care, care occupancy, detention occupancy, end-of-life signal, specified operating lifetime, switching device, treatment, and treatment occupancy.

e) Requirements respecting replacement date, warning signal, quantity indicator, and secondary power supply have been revised and requirements respecting end-of-life signal have been added.

f) Marking requirements for AC-operated plug-in devices have been revised and marking requirements for devices with low-level CO indication have been added.

g) Additional instructions for devices designated for low-level CO indication have been included, wording respecting symptoms of CO poisoning has been revised, and a statement clarifying the location of devices has been added.

h) The testing methodology has been expanded to include description of a testing procedure and a testing equipment with respect to sensitivity testing for CO alarming device with low-level CO indication, and provisions for an electric shock current test.

i) The stability testing requirements have been revised for clarity.

j) The required time-of-manufacture reliability testing and measurement of in-service reliability have been amended to include CO devices with low-level CO indication.

k) Permanent marking replacement date requirements for both the alarm and packaging have been added.

Scope

1.1
This Standard applies to single- and multiple-station carbon monoxide (CO) alarming devices and the CO portion of multi-criteria and multi-sensor (combination) alarms (hereafter referred to as devices). These devices are intended for use in ordinary locations in residential occupancies and include, but are not limited to, dwelling units, recreational vehicles and mobile homes, unconditioned areas, and facilities providing detention occupancy, treatment occupancy, and care occupancy.

1.2
This Standard applies to devices that are intended to protect against acute effects of exposure to CO. Devices are intended to alarm at CO levels below those which could cause a loss of ability to react to the dangers of CO exposure.

Devices are not intended to provide an alarm signal during long-term, low-level CO exposures or slightly higher short term transient CO exposure.

Devices, including the types that numerically display low (< 30 ppm) CO levels, are not intended to provide an alarm signal during long-term, low-level CO exposures or slightly higher short-term transient CO exposure.

1.3
This Standard also applies to remote accessories that might be connected to or are intended to be employed with a single- or multiple-station CO alarm.

1.4
This Standard does not apply to

a) smoke alarms;

b) smoke detectors;

c) heat detectors; and

d) gas or vapour detectors and sensors.

Furthermore, the devices covered by this Standard are not intended for industrial and commercial applications.

1.5
In this Standard, “shall” is used to express a requirement, i.e., a provision that the user is obliged to satisfy in order to comply with the Standard; “should” is used to express a recommendation or that which is advised but not required; and “may” is used to express an option or that which is permissible within the limits of the Standard.

Notes accompanying clauses do not include requirements or alternative requirements; the purpose of a note accompanying a clause is to separate from the text explanatory or informative material.

Notes to tables and figures are considered part of the table or figure and may be written as requirements.

Annexes are designated normative (mandatory) or informative (non-mandatory) to define their application.

1.6
The values given in SI units are the units of record for the purposes of this Standard. The values given in parentheses are for information and comparison only.

Ordering and availability

This publication is available both in printed and PDF edition.

CSA ANSI Z21.11.2-2016

Gas-Fired Room Heaters – Volume II, Unvented Room Heaters

Published by: 2016-11-07 / 2016-11-07 / 152 pages

Preface

This is the twenty-eighth edition of ANSI Z21.11.2, Gas-fired room heaters, volume II, unvented room heaters. It supersedes the previous editions published in 2013, 2011, 2007, 2000, 1996, 1992, 1989, 1983, 1978, 1974, 1971, 1967, and 1962.

Scope

1.1
This Standard applies to newly produced gas-fired unvented room heaters and gas-fired unvented decorative room heaters for connection to the house fuel supply system (see Clause 3), hereinafter referred to as room heaters or appliances, constructed entirely of new, unused parts and materials, having input ratings up to and including 40,000 Btu/hr (11,723 W) except:

a) unvented room heaters suitable for installation in bedrooms have input ratings of 10,000 Btu/hr (2,931 W) or less; and

b) unvented room heaters suitable for installation in bathrooms have input ratings of 6000 Btu/hr (1,758 W) or less.

1.2
This Standard covers unvented room heaters and gas-fired unvented decorative room heaters that comply with either of the following types:

a) shipped from the factory equipped specifically for use with one gas only. Field conversion of gas types by any means including the use of a kit are not permitted; or

b) a universal unvented room heater shipped from the factory equipped with a switching means for selecting the type of gas to which it is being connected.

1.3
Unvented room heaters are:

a) for use with natural gas;

b) for use with manufactured gas;

c) for use with mixed gas;

d) for use with propane gas;

e) for use with LP gas-air mixtures; and

f) for manufactured (mobile) home aftermarket installation for use with natural gas only or for use with propane gas only.

1.4
Universal unvented room heaters are:

a) for use with propane and for use with natural gas when provision is made for a switching means from one gas to the other; and

b) for manufactured (mobile) home or mobile home aftermarket installation for use with propane and for use with natural gas when provision is made for a switching means from one gas to the other (see Clause 4.1.5).

1.5
Unvented room heaters for installation in bathrooms are to be wall-mounted. Unvented room heaters for installation in bedrooms are to be wall-mounted or for installation in solid-fuel burning fireplaces. An unvented gas log (see Clause 3), provided with means for mounting the burner base assembly to the floor of the solid-fuel burning fireplace, shall be considered as complying with the wall-mounted requirement for installation in bedrooms or bathrooms.

1.6
The construction of unvented room heaters for use with the above-mentioned gases is covered under Clause 4.

1.7
The performance of unvented room heaters for use with the above-mentioned gases is covered under Clause 5.

1.8
This Standard covers appliances shipped from the factory equipped specifically for one gas only. Field conversion of gas types is not permitted.

1.9
Special construction provisions applicable to room heaters for manufactured (mobile) home aftermarket installation are outlined under Clauses 1.3(f), 4.20.4, and 4.21.3(j).

1.10
If a value for measurement as given in this Standard is followed by an equivalent value in other units, the first stated value is to be regarded as the specification.

1.11
All references to psi throughout this Standard are to be considered gauge pressure unless otherwise specified.

1.12
Clause 2 contains a list of standards referenced in this Standard, and sources from which these reference standards may be obtained.

1.13
In this Standard, “shall” is used to express a requirement, i.e. a provision that the user is obliged to satisfy in order to comply with the Standard; “should” is used to express a recommendation or that which is advised but not required; and “may” is used to express an option or that which is permissible within the limits of the Standard.

Notes accompanying clauses do not include requirements or alternative requirements; the purpose of a note accompanying a clause is to separate from the text explanatory or informative material.

Notes to tables and figures are considered part of the table or figure and may be written as requirements.

Annexes are designated normative (mandatory) or informative (non-mandatory) to define their application.

Ordering and availability

This publication is available both in printed and PDF edition.

CSA M669-11

Lighting and Marking of Agricultural Equipment on Highways (Adopted ANSI/ASAE S279.15 SEP2010)

Published by: 2011-12-01 / 2011-12-01 / 20 pages

Preface

This is the fifth edition of CSA M669, Lighting and marking of agricultural equipment on highways, which is an adoption without modification of the identically titled ANSI/ASAE (American National Standards Institute/American Society of Agricultural Engineers) Standard S279.15 SEP2010. It supersedes the previous edition, published in 2004, which was an adoption of ANSI/ASAE Standard S279.12 DEC02.

In conjunction with the adoption of this new edition of ANSI/ASAE S279, CSA is also withdrawing CAN/CSA-M663-92, Seven-Pin Electrical Connector and Cable for Agricultural Towing/Towed Equipment. The technical content of CAN/CSA-M663-92 is now addressed in this new edition of CSA M669.

Purpose

This Standard provides specifications for lighting and marking of agricultural equipment whenever such equipment is operating or is traveling on a highway.

Ordering and availability

This publication is available both in printed and PDF edition.

CSA NGV 6.1-2016

Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) fuel storage and delivery systems for road vehicles

Published by: 2016-09-01 / 2016-09-01 / 78 pages

Preface

This is the first edition of CSA NGV 6.1, Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) fuel storage and delivery systems for road vehicles. Although this Recommended Practice provides recommended standard practices, it has been written in mandatory language to accommodate its adoption by anyone wishing to do so. This Recommended Practice was prepared by the NGV 6.1 Subcommittee on Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) Fuel Systems, under the jurisdiction of the Technical Committee on Natural Gas Powered Vehicles and Fuelling and the Joint Automotive Technical Committee.

Scope

1.1
This Recommended Practice applies to the design, installation, inspection, repair, and maintenance of a fuel storage and delivery system installed in an on road vehicle for use with compressed natural gas (CNG). This includes a fuel system on a self-propelled vehicle for the provision of motive power.

Note: This Recommended Practice is intended to cover the fuel storage and delivery system as defined in Figure 1. Elements downstream of the regulation device(s) or stage(s) such as the low pressure delivery line and injectors are not included in the Scope of this Recommended Practice.

1.2
This Recommended Practice does not apply to:

a) stationary engines;

b) mobile equipment using natural gas as a fuel for other than propulsion; or

c) electronic control module or controls strategy of a fuel management system.

Future editions of this Recommended Practice may include:

a) liquefied natural gas (LNG) fuel storage system;

b) compressed natural gas (CNG) portion of an LNG vehicle;

c) storage or utilization of natural gas on boats or trains;

d) powered industrial trucks;

e) off road applications including mining applications, all-terrain vehicles; and

f) motorcycles.

1.3
OEM compressed natural gas vehicles and containers that have been qualified under the Canadian Motor Vehicle Safety Regulations or U.S. Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards (FMVSS) are exempt from the requirements in this Recommended Practice.

1.4
All references to pressure throughout this Recommended Practice are to be considered gauge pressures, unless otherwise specified.

1.5
This Recommended Practice contains SI (Metric) with corresponding English units, the purpose being to allow the Recommended Practice to be used in SI (Metric) units. American National Standard for Metric Practice, IEEE/ASTM SI 10, or ISO 80000-1, Quantities and units – Part 1: General, is used as a guide in making English conversion from metric units. If a value for a measurement and a corresponding value in 14other units are stated, the first stated value is to be regarded as the requirement. The given corresponding value may be approximate. If a value for a measurement and a corresponding value in other units are both specified as a quoted marking requirement, the first stated unit, or both, are to be provided.

Where the word “gallon” is used in this Recommended Practice, it indicates a U.S. gallon equivalent to 3.785 liters water capacity.

1.6
In this Recommended Practice, “shall” is used to express a requirement, i.e., a provision that the user is obliged to satisfy in order to comply with existing codes; “should” is used to express a recommendation or that which is advised but not required; and “may” is used to express an option or that which is permissible within the limits of the Recommended Practice.

Notes accompanying clauses do not include requirements or alternative requirements; the purpose of a note accompanying a clause is to separate from the text explanatory or informative material.

Notes to tables and figures are considered part of the table or figure and may be written as requirements.

Annexes are designated normative (mandatory) or informative (non-mandatory) to define their application.

Ordering and availability

This publication is available both in printed and PDF edition.

CSA A500-16

Building guards

Published by: 2016-09-01 / 2016-09-01 / 118 pages

Preface

This is the first edition of CSA A500, Building guards.

This Standard was prepared in response to requests from stakeholders who saw the need for a standard for materials, design, construction, testing, and performance of building guards. The Standard was developed through the collaboration of designers, engineers, fabricators, suppliers, building owners, property developers, regulators, and other technical specialists.

Special recognition is given to the members of the Writers Working Group for developing content for this Standard.

CSA Group acknowledges that the development of this Standard was made possible, in part, by the financial support of Concord Adex, Daniels Group, Grappe Industrielle d%u2019Aluminium du Quebec (GIAQ), Ontario Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Housing, RESCON, Royal Guard, State Window Corporation, Toro Aluminum Railings, and Tridel-Deltera.

Introduction

0.1 General

This Standard was developed in response to a request from stakeholders who saw the need for a standard for materials, design, construction, testing, and performance of building guards.

0.2 Intent

The intent of this Standard is to specify minimum requirements for the materials, design, construction, testing, and performance of building guards and to provide guidance on assessing guards to maintain ongoing minimum performance levels.

This Standard is intended to be

a) adopted by building code regulations in provinces and territories across Canada;

b) reviewed and updated from time to time to reflect the current state of knowledge of building guards; and

c) used in its entirety.

Scope

1.1 General

This Standard specifies requirements for the materials, design, construction, testing, and performance of building guards.

This Standard applies to building guards required as protective barriers to prevent accidental falls from one level to another.

Notes:

1) This includes walls acting as guards.

2) Guards can be with or without openings, around openings in floors, or at the open sides of stairs, landings, balconies, mezzanines, galleries, raised walkways, or other locations.

1.2 Exclusions

This Standard does not apply to

a) temporary guards regulated elsewhere by applicable health and safety requirements;

b) guards for resisting impact from vehicles;

c) guards used in Group F (industrial occupancy) buildings as set out by the National Building Code of Canada (NBC); and

d) guards used in Group A (assembly occupancy) buildings that are permitted to be designed to other requirements as set out by the National Building Code of Canada (NBC), such as in places of assembly with fixed seats or bleacher seats.

1.3 Terminology

In this Standard, “shall” is used to express a requirement, i.e., a provision that the user is obliged to satisfy in order to comply with the Standard; “should” is used to express a recommendation or that which is advised but not required; and “may” is used to express an option or that which is permissible within the limits of the Standard.

Notes accompanying clauses do not include requirements or alternative requirements; the purpose of a note accompanying a clause is to separate from the text explanatory or informative material.

Notes to tables and figures are considered part of the table or figure and may be written as requirements.

Annexes are designated normative (mandatory) or informative (non-mandatory) to define their application.

Ordering and availability

This publication is available both in printed and PDF edition.

CSA N290.5-16

Requirements for Electrical Power and Instrument Air Systems of CANDU Nuclear Power Plants

Published by: 2016-08-01 / 2016-08-01 / 40 pages

Preface

This is the third edition of CSA N290.5, Requirements for electrical power and instrument air systems of CANDU nuclear power plants. It supersedes the previous editions, published in 2006 and 1990.

Note: CANDU (CANada Deuterium Uranium) is a ®Registered trademark of Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., used under exclusive license by Candu Energy Inc, a Member of the SNC-Lavalin Group.

Changes to this edition include new requirements, guidance, and recommendations for beyond design basis accident requirements arising from the Fukushima Daiichi event including requirements for design extension conditions.

Consistent with industry initiatives to further classify and subdivide the beyond design basis accident regime, this Standard has been updated to address design extension conditions to the extent they are applicable to electrical power and instrument air systems. Other requirements for beyond design basis accidents are addressed in CSA N290.16.

The CSA N-Series Standards provide an interlinked set of requirements for the management of nuclear facilities and activities. The CSA N286 Standard provides overall direction to management to develop and implement sound management practices and controls, while the other CSA nuclear Standards provide technical requirements and guidance that support the management system. This Standard works in harmony with CSA N286 and does not duplicate the generic requirements of CSA N286; however, it can provide more specific direction for those requirements.

This Standard reflects the operating experience of the Canadian nuclear power industry.

Users of this Standard are reminded that the design, manufacture, construction, commissioning, operation, and decommissioning of nuclear facilities in Canada are subject to the provisions of the Nuclear Safety and Control Act and its supporting Regulations.

Scope

1.1
This Standard covers the design, procurement, qualification, construction, installation, testing, commissioning, and documentation of CANDU nuclear power plant electrical power and instrument air systems.

1.2
Electrical power and instrument air systems of CANDU nuclear power plants include all structures, systems, and components that are necessary to meet the plant design requirements, including the requirements for design extension conditions (DECs).

1.3
Electrical power systems consist of the Class I, II, III, IV, and other electrical systems that are required to meet the plant design requirements.

1.4
Instrument air systems consist of the components of the plant instrument air system and other provisions to provide compressed gas that is necessary to meet the plant design requirements.

1.5
This Standard was developed specifically for CANDU nuclear power plant designs and satisfies the applicable requirements of CNSC REGDOC-2.5.2.

1.6
In this Standard, “shall” is used to express a requirement, i.e., a provision that the user is obliged to satisfy in order to comply with the Standard; “should” is used to express a recommendation or that which is advised but not required; and “may” is used to express an option or that which is permissible within the limits of the Standard.

Notes accompanying clauses do not include requirements or alternative requirements; the purpose of a note accompanying a clause is to separate from the text explanatory or informative material.

Notes to tables and figures are considered part of the table or figure and may be written as requirements.

Annexes are designated normative (mandatory) or informative (non-mandatory) to define their application.

Ordering and availability

This publication is available both in printed and PDF edition.

CSA Z94.3.1-16

Guideline for selection, use, and care of protective eyewear

Published by: 2016-09-01 / 2016-09-01 / 31 pages

Preface

This is the second edition of CSA Z94.3.1, Guideline for selection, use, and care of eye and face protectors. It supersedes the previous edition, published in 2009 under the title Selection, use, and care of protective eyewear.

The Guideline covers the selection, use, and care of eye and face protectors and provides advice for the proper selection of eye and face protection for specific hazardous activities.

Major changes to this edition include the following:

a) added terminology on compliance and certification of eye and face protectors (see Table 1);

b) revised the laser classes in accordance with the current edition of ANSI Z136.1 (see Clause 6.1);

c) added allowance for arc flash protectors and requirements that apply to arc flash protective equipment (see Clause 6.2);

d) updated the lens materials and properties (see Clause 7);

e) added guidelines for safety eyewear fit testing (see Clause 8); and

f) added two new hazard types, Hazard Types I (lasers) and J (electric arc flash) in the selection of protectors for each hazard type (see Clauses 12 and 13).

Introduction

This Guideline has been developed as a complementary document to CSA Z94.3. The purpose of this Guideline is to provide advice for the proper selection of eye and face protection in relation to the specific hazardous activity involved; not all hazards have been identified in this Guideline.

For eye and face protection to be effective, it must be properly selected for the job and fitted to the wearer.

Note: CSA Z94.3 requires that prescription safety eyewear be fitted by a qualified professional (e.g., a licensed ophthalmic practitioner).

The first choice in preventing eye injuries is to design work procedures and equipment so that workers are not exposed to eye hazards. However, the total elimination of eye hazards from the workplace is often not possible, and other measures must be taken to control residual hazards so that they do not result in injuries to workers and others in the work zone. One such control measure is the wearing of personal protective equipment (such as eye and face protectors). It is well recognized that the majority of eye injuries can be prevented by wearing appropriate protective eyewear and following basic safety rules.

Any well-designed eye and face protection program should be part of an effective occupational health and safety management system. Specifications for such a management system can be found in CAN/ CSA-Z1000. This Guideline is based on the Plan-Do-Check-Act model of safety management, and it lays out the basis for proper management of personal protective equipment as a necessary strategy for injury and illness prevention.

Notes:

1) As a first step to selection of proper eye protection, a hazard assessment/risk analysis of the workplace should be done to identify the hazard type(s).

2) Refer to Clause 13 of this Guideline for hazards and recommended protectors.

3) Refer to applicable provincial/federal occupational health and safety legislation.

Ordering and availability

This publication is available both in printed and PDF edition.

CSA N299.3-16

Quality assurance program requirements for the supply of items and services for nuclear power plants, Category 3

Published by: 2016-09-01 / 2016-09-01 / 64 pages

Preface

This is the first edition of CSA N299.3, Quality assurance program requirements for the supply of items and services for nuclear power plants, Category 3.

The CSA N299 series of Standards defines a consistent set of quality assurance program requirements for the provision of items and services for nuclear power plants.

Users of this Standard are reminded that civilian nuclear facilities in Canada are subject to the provisions of the Nuclear Safety and Control Act and its Regulations. The Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) can therefore impose additional requirements to those specified in this Standard.

The CSA N-Series Standards provide an interlinked set of requirements for the management of nuclear facilities and activities. CSA N286 provides overall direction to management to develop and implement sound management practices and controls, while the other CSA Group nuclear Standards provide technical requirements and guidance that support the management system. This Standard works in harmony with CSA N286 and does not duplicate the generic requirements of CSA N286; however, it may provide more specific direction for those requirements.

The following people made valuable contributions to the development of the seed documents for the N299 series of Standards: G. Cairns; L. Colligan; A. Galati (COG); N. Gaudani (COG); S. Harris (Ontario Power Generation); P. Karsten (Bruce Power); W. Kettle (Ontario Power Generation); J. Lopez (Bruce Power); M. Pletosu (Ontario Power Generation); D. Rowland (Bruce Power); and M. Small (Ontario Power Generation).

This Standard was prepared by the Subcommittee on Quality Assurance Program Requirements for Supply of Items and Services for Nuclear Power Plants, under the jurisdiction of the Technical Committee on Management Systems for Nuclear Facilities and the Strategic Steering Committee on Nuclear Standards, and has been formally approved by the Technical Committee.

0 Introduction

0.1 Background

The CSA Z299 series of Standards (referred to collectively as “CSA Z299”) was selected by Ontario Hydro and AECL in the 1970s as the quality assurance standard for the procurement of items and services for their nuclear facilities. As a result, the CSA Z299 Standards were embedded in the design bases of all nuclear power stations and some utility-owned nuclear facilities licensed in Canada, and continue to be used. These Standards were initially developed from Ontario Hydro quality standards and contained many of the requirements that were in force at that time. When the CSA N286 series of Standards were developed in the late 1970s, they referenced CSA Z299 as the recommended quality assurance standard for items and services. CSA Z299 was a commercial standard used broadly both nationally and internationally, and it was the pre-cursor to development of the ISO 9000 series of Standards. With the development of ISO 9001 in 1994, ISO 9001 became the commercial quality standard that was generally adopted by industry. CSA Z299 was no longer supported by the Technical Committee in charge of CSA Z299, and it was eventually withdrawn.

Internationally, there have been mixed approaches to creating industry-specific QA standards, such as augmenting ISO 9001 or creating completely new standards. CSA Z299 has not been issued since 1985 and needed to be updated to reflect current needs. To fulfill this need, nuclear utilities have developed, through a joint COG project, a set of graded standards that align with the withdrawn CSA Z299 series so that the impact to the design basis and content transition to the new standards is minimized. These graded standards were used as the seed documents for the new N299 series of Standards, which incorporates operating experience and current best practices and harmonizes, to the extent possible, with other standards (both national and international).

0.2 Category series

This is the third in a series of four standards for the four quality assurance program categories (Category 1 to Category 4).

This Standard was developed in response to industry need for a quality assurance standard for items and services supplied to nuclear power plants.

1 Scope

1.1

1.1.1

This Standard defines minimum requirements for a supplier’s quality assurance program (hereafter referred to as “QA program”) for existing nuclear power plants — Category 3.

Notes:
1) This Standard does not include a separate implementation guide; instead, relevant guidance is found throughout the Standard as notes, or within the relevant annex (see Annexes B through E).

2) This Standard may be used by other nuclear facilities.

1.1.2

The QA program is aimed primarily at verifying production processes, as well as planning inspection and test verifications, and corrective actions that

a) ensure items or services conform to specified requirements; and

b) readily detect and control the disposition of nonconformances and prevent their recurrence.

1.2

This Standard applies to suppliers and subsuppliers when specified by the customer.
Note: Other QA program standards or management system standards may be used provided that the requirements of this Standard are met.

1.3

1.3.1

The requirements of this Standard apply to the control of the use of software employed in the operation of process, production, inspection, and test equipment.

1.3.2

This Standard does not apply to the design, use, development, or coding of analytical software.
Note: When a QA program is needed for these aspects, then a standard written specifically for them should be used.

1.4

In this Standard, “shall” is used to express a requirement, i.e., a provision that the user is obliged to satisfy in order to comply with the standard; “should” is used to express a recommendation or that which is advised but not required; and “may” is used to express an option or that which is permissible within the limits of the Standard.

Notes accompanying clauses do not include requirements or alternative requirements; the purpose of a note accompanying a clause is to separate from the text explanatory or informative material.

Notes to tables and figures are considered part of the table or figure and may be written as requirements.

Annexes are designated normative (mandatory) or informative (non-mandatory) to define their application.

Ordering and availability

This publication is available both in printed and PDF edition.

CSA N290.6-16

Requirements for monitoring and display of nuclear power plant safety functions in the event of an accident

Published by: 2016-08-01 / 2016-08-01

Preface

This is the third edition of CSA N290.6, Requirements for monitoring and display of nuclear power plant safety functions in the event of an accident. It supersedes the previous editions, published in 2009 and 1982.

Major changes to this edition include new requirements, guidance, and recommendations for design extension condition monitoring as a subset of beyond design basis accidents. The scope of this standard has been broadened to include requirements for monitoring of irradiated fuel bays under design extension conditions.

Consistent with industry initiatives to further classify and subdivide the beyond design basis accident regime, the informative annex on severe accidents in the 2009 edition has been incorporated into the body of the standard to the extent it is applicable to accident monitoring for design extension conditions. Other requirements for beyond design basis accidents are addressed in the CSA N290.16 standard.

The CSA N-Series Standards provide an interlinked set of requirements for the management of nuclear facilities and activities. The CSA N286 Standard provides overall direction to management to develop and implement sound management practices and controls while the other CSA nuclear Standards provide specific technical requirements and guidance that support the management system. This Standard works in harmony with CSA N286 and does not duplicate the generic requirements of CSA N286; however, it can provide more specific direction for meeting those requirements.

This Standard provides requirements and recommendations for the design and qualification of those components specifically involved in the monitoring and display of safety functions for a nuclear reactor. The monitoring and display of nuclear power plant variables following an accident are important safety functions; appropriate operator actions following such an event rely on the availability of essential information.

Users of this Standard are reminded that additional and site-specific requirements might be specified by federal, provincial/territorial, or municipal authorities. This Standard should not be considered a replacement for the requirements contained in any

a) applicable federal/territorial, or provincial statute, including the Nuclear Safety and Control Act; or

b) regulation, license, or permit issued pursuant to an applicable statute.

Scope

1.1
This Standard provides requirements for the design and qualification of components for the monitoring and display of nuclear power plants (NPP) and irradiated fuel bay safety functions in the event of a design basis accident (DBA) or a design extension condition (DEC).

Note: The requirements for a DBA and those for a DEC might differ. Where requirements differ for a DBA and a DEC, the difference is explicitly stated.

1.2
This Standard applies to existing NPPs and new NPPs.

Notes:

1) The requirements for new plants and existing plants might differ. Where requirements differ for new plants and existing plants, the difference is explicitly stated.

2) This Standard may provide guidance for nuclear facilities other than NPPs, using a graded approach.

1.3
This Standard addresses the specific requirements for the monitoring and display of safety functions under DECs.

Note: Requirements and guidance regarding DECs [as a subset of beyond design basis accidents (BDBAs)] are covered in CSA N290.16.

1.4
This Standard applies to components and systems that enable NPP staff, in the event of an accident, to

a) monitor the plant safety functions;

Note: The purpose of monitoring the plant safety functions is to guide operator actions that might be required as a part of the accident response.

b) monitor plant conditions for the purposes of accident management; and

Note: Accident management refers to specific actions taken within the NPP during the evolution of an accident to prevent escalation, mitigate consequences, and to achieve a long-term controlled stable state. Accident management actions are the responsibility of the plant operator. Refer to CNSC REGDOC-2.3.2 for further clarification.

c) monitor parameters for the initiation of on-site and off-site emergency management.

Note: Emergency management in this context refers to the overall coordinated response to, mitigation of, and recovery from a nuclear emergency. Emergency management is not concerned with the specific actions taken within the NPP to manage the accident (i.e., accident management as described above). Emergency management actions can be the responsibility of the operating organization or other jurisdictions (e.g., operator emergency response organizations, government bodies, emergency workers). Refer to CSA N1600 for guidance on nuclear emergency categorization and notification.

1.5
This Standard applies only to the functions associated with monitoring in the event of an accident; other monitoring functions are beyond the scope of this Standard.

Plant systems, including safety systems and process control systems, can provide functions associated with monitoring in the event of an accident as a part of the design.

Note: The design of monitoring capability for process and safety systems are covered in other CSA N290 Standards.

1.6
In this Standard, “shall” is used to express a requirement, i.e., a provision that the user is obliged to satisfy in order to comply with the Standard; “should” is used to express a recommendation or that which is advised but not required; and “may” is used to express an option or that which is permissible within the limits of the Standard.

Notes accompanying clauses do not include requirements or alternative requirements; the purpose of a note accompanying a clause is to separate from the text explanatory or informative material.

Notes to tables and figures are considered part of the table or figure and may be written as requirements.

Annexes are designated normative (mandatory) or informative (non-mandatory) to define their application.

1.7
In this Standard, “shall be considered” or “shall consider” means that the user evaluates the impact and documents any decisions.

Note: Examples can include no action, operating procedures, design features.

Ordering and availability

This publication is available both in printed and PDF edition.

CSA Z620.1-16

Reduction of fugitive and vented emissions for upstream petroleum and natural gas industry systems

Published by: 2016-07-01 / 2016-07-01 / 55 pages

Preface

This is the first edition of CSA Z620.1, Reduction of fugitive and vented emissions for upstream petroleum and natural gas industry systems.

This Standard uses pollutant minimization through control at source. This approach allows users to apply this Standard across the petroleum and natural gas industry.

This Standard is one of several standards on fugitive and vented emissions across different sectors of the oil and gas industry. Therefore, this Standard should be read in conjunction with other legislation, regulations, best practices, policies, standards, and applicable codes.

CSA Group acknowledges that the development of this Standard was made possible, in part, by the support of the British Columbia Oil and Gas Commission, the Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers (CAPP), the National Energy Board, the Alberta Energy Regulator, and the Technical Committee members and their organizations.

Introduction

This Standard applies to unintentional and intentional hydrocarbon gas releases to the atmosphere. These releases are often referred to as fugitive or vented emissions.

This Standard is intended to provide minimum requirements, guidance, and best practices for the reduction or, where practicable, elimination of fugitive and vented emissions from the upstream oil and natural gas industry. Implementation of this Standard can also contribute to a safer work environment.

The development of this Standard considered the following elements:

a) resource conservation efforts;

b) air quality and greenhouse gas issues;

c) environmental concerns; and

d) economics, feasibility, and available technologies.

Scope

1.1
This Standard specifies criteria to develop emission reduction practices and programs.

1.2
This Standard addresses fugitive and vented emissions from point sources in the following sectors (see Figure 1) of the upstream oil and gas industry from wells, pipelines, and facilities associated with

a) crude oil production and shale oil;

b) oil sands – in situ bitumen production, including thermal (i.e., steam-assisted gravity drainage and cyclic steam stimulation) and non-thermal (i.e., water and polymer injection schemes) projects;

c) natural gas production, including conventional, coal bed methane, and shale gas; and

d) natural gas processing.

Application of this Standard to new and existing wells, pipelines, and facilities is specified within each clause of the Standard.

1.3
This Standard does not include requirements for fugitive and vented emissions from vent sources or area sources for the following sectors:

a) crude oil terminals, including pipeline and rail terminals

b) downstream sector (including refineries and upgraders);

c) transmission and distribution applications;

d) oil sands – mining operations;

e) oil sands – upgraders;

f) straddle plants;

g) underground hydrocarbon storage;

h) liquefied natural gas plants; and

i) offshore applications.

1.4
Reporting requirements are the responsibility of the regulator having jurisdiction.

1.5
In this Standard, “shall” is used to express a requirement, i.e., a provision that the user is obliged to satisfy in order to comply with the standard; “should” is used to express a recommendation or that which is advised but not required; and “may” is used to express an option or that which is permissible within the limits of the Standard.

Notes accompanying clauses do not include requirements or alternative requirements; the purpose of a note accompanying a clause is to separate from the text explanatory or informative material.

Notes to tables and figures are considered part of the table or figure and may be written as requirements.

Annexes are designated normative (mandatory) or informative (non-mandatory) to define their application.

Ordering and availability

This publication is available both in printed and PDF edition.